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New York Times to Launch Local Neighborhood Blogs
/ February 27, 2009 3:38 pm

New York - The New York Times will debut a local neighborhood blog network next week, which will cover "cultural events, bar and restaurant openings, real estate, arts, fashion, health, [and] social concerns," according to an email sent to Brownstoner.com republished by TechCrunch. The two pilot blogs will cover Fort Greene and Clinton Hill in Brooklyn, and Milburn, Maplewood and South Orange in New Jersey. Jim Schachter, editor for digital initiatives at The New York Times, confirmed the plan for TechCrunch, adding that the pilot blogs will be staffed by Times reporters, and "expect to sell ads to local merchants using our telesales and self-serve ad solution."

 

Related Links:

http://snipurl.com/cs919

(TechCrunch)

http://www.brownstoner.com/brownstoner/archives/2009/02/the_times_to_st.php


3 Comments

  • Excuse me. When they discover the center of the universe, a lot of people will be disappointed to discover they are not it.
    I am from Poland and learning to speak English, tell me right I wrote the following sentence: “Preschools are a great way to enhance the children with the basic learning tools.”

    Thank :) Helene.

  • It’s The Times’ news organization that’s the important thing. Like it or not, the newsgathering organization continues to lead. The blogosphere cannot exist (not yet, anyway) without the traditional media. Bloggers don’t employs large staffs that report on specific beats and topics. Bloggers don’t maintain news and photography bureaus in international cities. Bloggers don’t attempt to investigate or explore subjects outside of their (often) narrow purview. Bloggers NEED traditional media. That said, papers like the Times will continue to seek ways to break into the undeniable momentum and (hopefully) profitability of the blog/online culture. ~dedicated server

  • I think this is a truly bold experiment for a mainstream publication like the New York Times. It has the potential to redefine the traditional boundaries between reader and journalist while capitalising on one of the NYT’s great assets, namely its brand and reputation.

    I am eagerly anticipating how this will work out, but it it does succeed, it may become one of the most noteworthy stories of the year.

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